Carlisle Indian Industrial School





                 THE INDIAN HELPER
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VOL. XII.   FRIDAY, June 25, 1897    NUMBER 37
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  Joseph Adams is rusticating at Hotel de Howe in the South Mountain, at Hunters' Run.

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VOL. XII.   FRIDAY, July 2, 1897    NUMBER 38
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  Joseph Adams has returned from Hunters' Run very much improved in health.

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VOL. XII.   FRIDAY, July 9, 1897    NUMBER 39
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  Those who have gone home since the last issue are Clark Smith, Joseph Adams, Frank Crouse, Allen Blackchief, Henry Redkettle, Samuel Lonebear, Peter Chiefeagle Shield, Thunderbull, Wesley Williams, Daniel Brown, Charles Fineday, Kirkwood Smith, E. Ricker, Bedford Forrest, Joseph West, Thos. Flynn, Joseph Craig, Chris. Fletcher, Louis Quarters, Peter Nahmais, Amos Metoxen, Elijah Wheelock, Josiah Archiquette, Brigman Cornelius, Samuel Miller, Charles Yarlot, Jack Stewart, Thomas Stewart, Daniel Morrison, Joseph Ezhuna, George Frass, Chester Smith, Henry Decorah, Andrew Blackcloud, George Suis, Joshua Walker, Edgar McCarthy, Carl Sweezy, William Kernosh, Fred Doaskado, Hugh Leider, Samuel Gruett, Peter Dillon, Abraham Lonebear, Phillip Marshall, Harry Marshall, Arthur Sickles, Joel Moore, Alexander Baird, Willie Couture, Thomas Smith, Frank Cajune, Johnson Spencer, William Greenbird, Joseph Blodgett, Jennie Lovejoy, Mary Cutfoot, Hattie Eaglehorn, Martha Walker, Annie McMillen, Mary Shebwasang, Angeline Chippewa, Mary Beaulieu, Tenie Wirth, Lizzie Howard, Rose Denomie, Ida Wheelock, Kitty Metoxen, Lavinia Adams, Lillie Schanandore, Melinda Metoxen, Melinda Thomas, Ophelia King, Sophy Huff, Leila Cornelius, Olive Miller, Grace Redeagle, Alice Sheffield, and Sarah Roubideaux.

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VOL. XII.   FRIDAY, August 13, 1897    NUMBER 44
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  Joseph Adams writes from his home at Siletz, Oregon, that he is getting quite well again, and is helping his father farm.  John Brown has also quite recovered from the operation he had performed while here, and is to come back to graduate.  Joe attended the Chemawa commencement, and saw many of his old friends.  He expects to go on a camping tour about fifty miles into the wilds of Oregon, soon.

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 VOL. XII.   FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1897    NUMBER 49
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   Joseph Adams has returned from the far West, Oregon.
 

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VOL. XIII.   FRIDAY, November 5, 1897    NUMBER 4
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   Mr. Joseph Adams left on Monday night for Colorado Springs, Colorado, where he will enter Colorado College as student.  He goes with the best wishes of a host of friends at Carlisle, who know Joe but to respect him.  He is a worthy young man and will soon prove himself so in his new environment.
 

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VOL. XIII. FRIDAY, January 7, 1898  NUMBER 12
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  Joseph Adams has a position at Haskell.

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VOL. XIII. FRIDAY, January 28, 1898  NUMBER 15
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   Mr. Joseph Adams is with us again, he having resigned his position at Haskell, to return to college.  He went west for his health and from his looks we judge that he found it in the Mountains of Colorado.

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 VOL. XIII. FRIDAY, May 13, 1898  NUMBER 30
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   Mr. Joseph Adams left for the Pacific Coast on Wednesday evening, in company with Miss Barr.  We hope they will have a pleasant trip across the continent.  It will be an entire change of scene and air to the latter, who needs it.  Her duties as Nurse in Chief of the hospital are a strain upon nerve and strength.  Joseph was in the sophomore class of Dickinson College, but has not been well for the past few months.  The War breezes which he will get straight from Manila and the breath from his native Oregon fir trees, will brace him up we are sure, so that he will be able to face the strongest and say "How Dewey do?"
 

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 VOL. XIII. FRIDAY, June 3, 1898  NUMBER 33
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   Miss Barr arrived from Oregon on Wednesday.  It will be remembered that she went home with Joseph Adams, who was in a rundown condition.  She speaks in highest terms of Joe's father, his step-mother, and all interested in him at his home.  They are good-hearted, sensible people and Joe will have every attention and care that loving hands and hearts can give.  The trip was a trial to him, but it is hoped that his health and strength will return. Miss Barr is full of interesting incidents of her trip.  She visited the Chemawa school; saw Mr. Potter, Mr. and Mrs. George and others.  John Brown, who went home ill, she says, is well and strong.  The George baby, Lavinia Florence, was so sweet and pretty she wanted to bring it back with her.  The band played for her and she has many pleasant things to say about the people and things she saw at that famous Indian school of the Pacific slope.

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 VOL. XIII. FRIDAY, June 24, 1898  NUMBER 36
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     Joseph Adams Is Dead.
   We have the sad and painful duty of recording the death of another loved member of our school.  Joseph Adams, who went to his home in Oregon, a few weeks since on account of ill health died ofConsumption on the 12th inst.  The deceased was a character of such frankness, nobility, purity and faithfulness to trust that none knew him but to love him.  Doctor Turner, of the Siltez Agency writes thus of his last hours:  "Joseph suffered but little and talked with a pleasant smile during his sickness.  There was a large funeral, and thus ends a noble life, while so many ignoble still live."  Miss Barr received a very few sad lines from him which must have been written but a few hours before his death, in which he said he was so tired.  Some of the words were so faint that they could not be made out.  Joseph was a graduate of Chemawa, having gone there a year and a half.  When he came to Carlisle in 1893, he entered the Dickinson Preparatory at once, and before he left had reached the Sophomore class in the college proper.  A year ago he went west for his health and remained in Colorado for several months.  The ambition to get through college brought him back to carlisle, and when he arrived he looked remarkably well, but the close study and effort again brought him low.
   Joseph had had considerable experience with the agency doctor, which fitted him for usefulness at once in our own hospital.  He was a nurse that the patients all liked and he enjoyed giving aid and comfort to the suffering.  Dr. Montezuma who was physician for a part of the time writes thus to Miss Barr:
   "I sympathize with you in relation to Joe.  Life is a mystery. What you have done for Joe can never be estimated.  You have one consolation, you have seen one boy who has been faithful and did his duty to the last moment.  I consider his life a glorious revelation.  He stood equal to Lieutenant Hobson.  He carried his ship while the battle of life was raging on every side.  Though he sank, his wreck on the road to success will be the only means to free our nation.  I cannot conceive of a grander spectacle than a fallen color-bearer with hand grasping the flag and body fallen toward the enemy.  Joe's death is grand, noble and sublime.  Our reward is not on earth.  It is beyond the grave where no disease can hinder or mar our advancement.  Joseph's character was truly exceptional and worthy of imitating.

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 VOL. XIII. FRIDAY, July 15, 1898  NUMBER 39
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   We are sorry to learn of the death of Joseph Adams on June 12, at his home in Oregon.  Joseph was assistant teacher at Haskell for a short time and won many friends by his gentle and courteous ways.
-[Haskell Leader.
 


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